Jesus of Nazareth: the first occupier

In the present day, American politics has become deeply entangled confluence with materialist, grand-scale Protestantism. To great aggravation, Christianity has been tied not only to constitutional self-governance (as this recent best-selling painting shows in a way that strongly resembles parody), but the laissez-faire economic system that has segregated its people and eroded liberty over the past two centuries. It has been used to argue for capital punishment, and for centuries has been used to create the idea of “just war”

The issue is that Jesus was not a fan of exploitative commerce. In fact, he led the first occupation- he was the founder of Occupy Jerusalem. In the gospels, he enters the Temple of Jerusalem, where commerce has defiled the holy place. He takes those around him to task, and uses the popular support for his actions to defy authority.

On reaching Jerusalem, Jesus entered the temple area and began driving out those who were buying and selling there. He overturned the tables of the money changers and the benches of those selling doves (Mark 11:15)

Later Jesus calls the Temple he cleared a “den of robbers” (Mark 11:17)

 

Jesus occupies the Temple

 

We can all learn from the example of Jesus. The idea of commerce and profit-making entering a place of worship is cringe-worthy- and indeed I have a visceral reaction when I read about megachurches with cafés and merchandise stores. But even if you’re mostly secular like me- there is something that you think should not be messed with; something that must remain pure and not tainted by money. It could be anything from politics to college sports; from education to healthcare. You probably know of some money changers you’d like to drive out.

And that’s really what Occupy is all about. Driving away the money changers, and improving society rather than let profit dominate over people.

People are more important than profits

Thursday evening, I attended a screening of The Healthcare Movie, a new documentary exploring the divergence of the Canadian and American healthcare systems over the past half century. Documentaries like Sicko do rightly point out America’s inferior system- both in financial sustainability and quality of care. The important aspect missing from Sicko is history. Why does the United States not have the same healthcare setup as its economic equals? Why have so many politicians, from Ted Kennedy to Teddy Roosevelt, failed?

There has been historical opposition from the American Medical Association  and in the last fifty years, private insurance companies. The famous Ronald Reagan Speaks Out Against Socialized Medicine (video) was part of an AMA campaign. Since the second Red Scare, connecting universal health insurance with the Soviet Union (or more recently, just saying “socialism” a couple dozen times) has been an effective method of stopping both universal coverage, as well as the initial, much stronger drafts of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act.

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Leave your fear behind

A way forward, past fear and intimidation

 

A few days ago, I got a package in the mail. It contained a pamphlet, one that is not famous like Common Sense by Thomas Paine, but in the modern world is deeply relevant and useful. It is, simply, a road to revolution.

From Dictatorship to Democracy is the distilled wisdom of Gene Sharp, an 84-year old academic who lives in East Boston. His life has been quiet- he has written no best-selling books, held no prestigious professorships. However, he is the world’s leading expert on nonviolent struggle. He believes that ideas and willpower are more powerful than guns. Through case studies, one learns that even in the face of the worst evil, nonviolence had been used and been used effectively. Fear is what keeps people in line, supporting their autocrats. But if you remove your support, your obedience, then dictatorships crumble before your eyes. Nonviolent struggle is a way to empower people, and give them a way forward, past fear.

Continue reading “Leave your fear behind”

The spectre of slavery

There are 27 million enslaved people in the world today. To put that in perspective, that is more than at any other time in history. It is perhaps the greatest failing of modern societies- every country has abolished slavery, and yet it is an epidemic of unprecedented scale. In the twentieth century, we eradicated smallpox, stopped famine in dozens of countries, and made strong progress against malaria and cholera. It would seem that with technology and international cooperation, we are on the path to ensuring basic standards of living for all people. The Millennium Development Goals – an ambitious set of priorities created by the United Nations, is being met (PDF, look at p. 2 for a good chart) in many instances, or at least there is some progress.

Yet we have failed to stop humans from owning other humans. It is endemic to all continents- from indentured domestic workers in southeast Asia and the Middle East to sexual trafficking in San Francisco. Our own country has never wrestled away the demon that is slavery. Though the war between one half of American and the other eventually declared slavery an abomination, the white plantation society continued working with sharecroppers rather than slaves. California ignored the Thirteenth Amendment and continued to make ‘vagrant’ indigenous people into slaves- well into the 1870s.

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Putting money where your community is

Yesterday, the city of Buffalo moved $45 million of city funds out of megabank JPMorgan Chase and reinvested it in First Niagara, a community bank based in the city itself. The drive to put city funds in local banks and credit unions was led by Occupy Buffalo.

Occupy San Jose in the fall of 2011 also raised the issue of muncipalities placing their funds in banks that aggressively foreclose on struggling families, and push credit cards with high interest rates on the desperate. In the Bay Area, the Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church in San Jose took $3 million out of Bank of America and Wells Fargo and put it in a small community bank. Our good friends at People Acting in Community Together (PACT) were instrumental in getting that to happen. Along with Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE), they are aggressive in preventing foreclosures through a variety of means.

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Writing group at UUCPA

I participated in the writing group facilitated by Rev. Dan Harper, head of the religious education at UUCPA. It was nice to hear memoir content from people decades my elder, including one who served in World War II. In response to the prompt about a ‘road trip’, I wrote a short reflection called ‘Handa’ about my trip to my ancestral town in Highland Scotland.

I’ll upload it when I’ve had time to type it out. It’s not presently very legible.

Dan also had the idea of collecting the group’s work into some sort of booklet. I am definitely interested, though this was my first time participating in the group and I know much less about the concept.

 

I said then, and I say now…

I said then, and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it, and while there is a criminal element I am of it, and while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.

Labor activist and Socialist Party politician Eugene V. Debs, on his sentencing for sedition, for speaking out against the United States’ involvement in World War I.

I said then, and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it, and while there is a criminal element I am of it, and while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.

Labor activist and Socialist Party politician Eugene V. Debs, on his sentencing for sedition, for speaking out against the United States’ involvement in World War I.